Newsletter – March 2017

Ingrid | Pembrokeshire

In 2014 a friend of mine, Pat Bannister, held a charity event, in aid of cancer, in her son’s garden. Of those that attended many donated a 12½” patchwork square. These squares were hung on a long washing line and made a colourful display. Afterwards, Pat and her friends set to and made them into quilts for Project Linus UK.


Mary and Sarah | Herefordshire

The Pludds Quilting Group from the Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire is a self-help group of quilters who meet on the third Tuesday of each month to sew and chat. Last year their community project was to make patchwork quilts for Linus and recently handed over 18 quilts they had made for sick and traumatised babies, children and teenagers. They would like to thank residents of The Pludds and other people who kindly donated fabric for this project.

Pludd quilters


Pip | Edinburgh

I would like to say a very big thank you to Project Linus for the quilt. My 17-month- old son was admitted to hospital on Christmas Eve, but despite being unwell, he was so excited when he saw his Thomas the Tank Engine blanket. It was such a lovely and thoughtful gift, thank you for putting a smile on all of our faces. Your hard work is greatly appreciated.


Sylvia | Warrington

Crazy Quilters and Knitters for Linus

We were fortunate to receive a grant from The Big Lottery last year. I was assisted in the application by Doreen, our treasurer. I had been contacted by Paula from Warrington Volunteer Support Services (WVSS) who suggested we apply to The Big Lottery following a previous failed application for local funding. We were looking for some money to restock some of our fabric and wool. Our group had grown to forty members and so the stock doesn’t last very long. This is despite members using some of their own stash. We normally have a couple of fund raising events a year plus whatever donations we manage to receive. We then use this money to buy wool and fabric to make more quilts and blankets. We had hoped to maybe get a few more rulers and equipment too as these things need to be replaced at times. Our group meet once a month in the Methodist Church Hall and on those days, we dedicate our time to Project Linus work. We have some equipment that is available for newcomers to use.

They invariably buy their own equipment when they get “hooked” on patchwork and quilting and they want to do more at home. Our knitters are happy if we keep them supplied with wool and have declined offers of getting a knitting machine. We don’t set targets on how many each person makes or how many a year. We accept that people have either jobs or other commitments and we all work at a different pace. Paula emphasised how much support we were giving to the local community as well as the recipients of the quilts and blankets we make. Following Paula’s advice, I asked members what they felt they gained by being a member of the group. We had some very positive remarks back. We were having four meetings a year when we would share a new or different technique, meeting like-minded people, giving something back to the community, sharing and growing, increased knowledge of a hobby. People living alone commented on meeting lots of smiley faces, making friends and giving and receiving support. We had several meetings with Paula who encouraged us to ask for more than we originally intended. She suggested we considered larger items but at the time the only thing on our wish list was a Long Arm Quilter. This would have meant renting accommodation to store and use it which was unrealistic.

Embroidery machine

After much thought, research and consideration we eventually decided to ask for sufficient funding to buy an embroidery machine. Although I had no personal experience of these machines one of our ladies did and had used hers to sandwich some of her Linus quilts together and they looked so beautiful we thought this may be worth a try. Doreen and I worked together to identify what we would ask for. We encouraged the knitters to explore different types of needles etc. but all they wanted was some nice wool to work with. We found quite a few things that would enable the sewers to improve and speed up the making of quilts but the embroidery machine was the main item we asked for, something we would never have raised enough funds for on our own.

The research and planning of our application was quite time consuming and seemed to take forever but eventually Doreen and I had another meeting with Paula and we agreed the application should be submitted. There was a period of about six to eight weeks when we had to wait for a decision to be made. I then received a conditional grant offer and completed the necessary paper work but at this stage we were not to make the offer public. We had to wait till The Big lottery gave a date when we could go public. We have one year to spend the grant money and have to have receipts for all purchases to prove the grant has been spent as we had intended, should anybody need it.

Ballerina embroidery

The Big lottery emphasise the importance of publicity to both promote your own project and to let National Lottery players see were the money they raise is spent. We named our project “A Hug in a Blanket” one of Linus sayings. They give lots of free plaques, stickers and other items and guidance. Since receiving the grant we have so far bought lots of the things we had planned. Whilst at a Stitching and Craft weekend I saw a similar embroidery machine to that I had researched. There was £200 off but for that weekend only. A few more committee members went to the show the next day to check it out. In the meantime, I had spoken to a more local sewing machine supplier, Bambers, and they said that in view of us being a Project Linus group they would give us a further discount. Needless to say, we spent that on embroidery threads with them and we will be longstanding customers for them.

We are at the very early stages of a steep learning curve, trying to learn as much as we can about the designs and the machine etc. Several ladies have made samples of the different patterns that are available. Some of our ladies feel a bit daunted (myself included) but when they watch us using it they are fascinated and pleased with the results. We plan to let everyone have a go over the next six months or so. Some of the knitters are keen to do appliqué motifs to go on the corner of their blankets. There are quite a few ideas buzzing round the group on the things we can do so watch this space. This was a fitting piece of equipment for the group to acquire on our 10th birthday year.I appreciate this is not suitable for all Linus groups, more so for community based groups but I would recommend other groups explore the possibility.


Ann | South Sheffield and Chesterfield

Just before Christmas one of our members was helping to give out food hampers to vulnerable families in Sheffield, through Besom, and wondered if we could give the children some of our quilts – which we were happy to do. We subsequently received this letter:

“I thank God for the wonderful hearts you have to help those in need. It was lovely to meet you and relieve you of all the quilts, bags and baby knits! All the quilts were put into the appropriate age bags and delivered with the food hampers. They were a great addition to our hampers and were all very gratefully received. We’ve had great feedback from clients and workers about what a difference they made. One family I delivered to, the dad said they didn’t think they would be able to give the children presents and now they would each have their own bag with a quilt in!”.

Newsletter – January 2017

Heather | News from HQ

Once again, we have surpassed our previous year’s total of quilts delivered throughout the United Kingdom. This year we have delivered just over 36,000 quilts compared to 30,000 last year. This is all down to the commitment of our co-ordinators and their volunteer quilters who want to give as many children as they can a hug they can keep.


Ann | Chesterfield and South Sheffield

Hi – My name is Denise and I am a very very proud mummy to Theo. He is an amazing little boy and has fought all his short life to stay alive. He has recently had his 37th operation and we met a little girl with one of your Linus quilts at Bluebell Woods Hospice – I thought it was amazing and thought that I would love Theo to be the proud owner of a quilt!

Theo-January-2017

Theo was born 4 month early and had 5 strokes in the first week of life. He has lost his stomach, is fed into his bowel which is now failing. Two years ago, meningitis took his sight but he still keeps fighting to be here. We are under Bluebell wood children’s hospice as Theo is palliative. He’s back in the hospital tomorrow – but want to send you this picture of him with his blanket. He’s taking the blankie with him. You must be a very special people and we really appreciate everything you do. Bless you all.

Thank you so much


Angela | West Dorset

I started as Coordinator in December 2010 and the Dorchester & District Angling Society (DDAS) have supported Project Linus in West Dorset every year. (The link is my father who was a very keen angler). When collecting membership fees every year they ask members to include an extra sum as a charitable donation and we have had the benefit of this. They have also had a duck race with the proceeds being divided between Project Linus and Julia’s House, the local hospice for children. This year they also had a fishing competition – guess the total weight of carp caught in a 24-hour period. A very cold 24-hour period with fish not biting I am told! Biting or not, it resulted in a massive cheque for £625 being presented to us.

I have totalled up all the donations from DDAS over the last years – £2604. They have been superb – so thank you lads!


Elspeth | Lanarkshire and Glasgow East

Jax January 2017

Hi there, My little boy has just received a lovely blanket from yourselves. I just wanted to message and say what a lovely thoughtful idea this is. Just as we were beginning to feel a little down in the dumps after being in ward 19 at Wishaw for 2 days the beautiful blanket we received has perked us up. This is my son Jax enjoying his blanket. Keep up the great work!

Maria x


Pip | Edinburgh Mid and East Lothian

Women’s Aid for East and Midlothian sent us this:

Hello to all you wonderfully skilled and generous women. I’m writing to tell you a little about the impact your quilts make in our service. I work for Women’s Aid East and Midlothian; I currently manage the children’s services. I’ve been around for 9 years. Our organisation supports Women, children and young people who have experienced domestic abuse. At times this can mean that a family comes to live in our accommodation with little more than what they carry in plastic bags. They have left all their possessions, friends, pets, toys and familiar things. Very often children are the last to know what is happening and are bundled up without any explanation or time to gather their most important things. They move into a new house, with lots of new rules about keeping safe. “Don’t tell anyone your address” “You can’t have your cousins over for a sleep over” At a sad and confusing time, we work hard to make things as best they can be. This is where your quilts come in. We believe that every child and woman should have something that belongs just to them (unfortunately our funders won’t pay for these things).

The quilts we receive from you go a massive way to providing way more than warmth. They are bright and cheerful, when all looks gloomy. They are handmade- a massive signal to a family that someone has spent time and care for them- a message of love. They are unique, like each of the family members who receive them. They are security as they are wrapped around a body. They are a story telling blanket, a magical carpet and a tent to hide in. The quilts you make and give to our service users, may be the first thing they have that no one will take from them, threaten to destroy or laugh at their connection with. Your hard work means so much to us, but more than, so much to our service users. So please accept our warmest gratitude and thanks for your effort, care, love and attention. It goes a long way to helping those on a journey of recovery and healing. Keep doing what you do so brilliantly

Fiona McCabe


Jane | Perth and Kinross

I recently held a Linus Workshop Day with Perth Quilting Group “Piece Partners”. A total of 14 quilts were made on the day and great fun was had by all.

Quilting day 1-17-news


Catherine | Carmarthenshire/Ceredigion

I would like to tell you about the Sew Saturday that was hosted on 15th September by our wonderful Kate Barnes, the owner of Calico Kate fabric shop in Lampeter, here in West Wales. Kate has always been a huge supporter of Project Linus, donating large quantities of fabric and completed quilts that have been on display in her shop. Her shop is an Aladdin’s cave of fabric spread over 8 rooms and two floors which brings quilters from many miles around. She decided to host a Sew Saturday to support Project Linus, Pyjama Fairies and the Air Ambulance and invited us to the shop to demonstrate our work and talk to those who were interested.

I made up 20 packs for tiny quilts to go to our local Special Baby Unit in Glan Gwili hospital and was able to hand out 14 of them – so far so good. I also handed out information sheets about Linus. Since that day my phone has been red hot with ladies wanting to tell me they had finished their quilts and could they have more packs, and I have given out another 10 packs with many more on order! Most delightfully of all, one lady runs a children’s club allied to her local church and they raised £180 via their Harvest festival which they are going to use to buy fabric and the children are going to have a go at making the quilts.


Pip | Edinburgh Mid and East Lothian

Poldrate Quilters, who meet in Haddington, East Lothian, have been staunch supporters of Project Linus for many years. They set themselves a challenge to make 100 quilts for Linus during 2016 and achieved this in December. Many congratulations and thanks to the group for this remarkable effort.

Newsletter – November 2016

Lyn | News from HQ

Well, the Halloween quilts have been distributed now. There is never enough boy’s fabric but I came across some lovely creepy cartoon skeletons at the Malvern show which seemed just the job. I was able to use large panels of the picture fabric with border of squares in black, white and a ghastly lime green to complete the spooky effect. These went to our local Foster Carers Association. Of course, there were girlie ones too and a couple of weighted quilts for autistic children to help them calm down. One of these was for a girl to help her sleep and one as a lap quilt for a boy who can’t sit still in class. All the fabric shops seem to have lots of flowers and also little kiddies cartoon stuff, but nothing for the bigger boys. Does Minecraft (which my 8-year-old grandson adores) charge too much for the use of its imagery?

Now, I guess quite a few of our supporters are doing the same as me – making quilts in Christmas colours. I have to admit that I am doing this with fabric that I bought several years ago and never got around to making up. This time it’s a simple rail fence pattern in black, red, green and white strips. I know that quite a few of you are making quilts for Syrian refugee children – they have a different requirement as Islam obviously doesn’t celebrate Christmas but they also do not approve of pictures of people or animals and want quilts with simple colour patterns. Variety is a really key part of our thinking so that each child can have a quilt which appeals to them and is, in some way, unique. So, use your imagination and your scraps.


Joy | Birmingham South

Well, the last couple of weeks have been very busy indeed! We spent two days sewing and quilting and made more quilts than I could have ever imagined.  On the first day at the Cadet Centre the troops completed 43 quilt tops made from squares and donated orphan blocks and had a thoroughly enjoyable day at the same time! There were a number of visitors throughout the day from organisations that benefit from the donation of Project Linus quilts. Amongst them were representatives from the QE talking about Teenage Cancer patients, Therapists, Bereavement counsellors and a lady talking about the work at Women’s Refuges. We all love to sew, but it is great to hear about the brilliant work that all of these people do to make the lives of children in need better, and gives us even more drive to keep donating time to make the quilts that we hear mean so much to the children that receive them.

Quilt workshop November 2016

The second day was held at the Cotton Patch Studio, where we managed to quilt 50 quilts over the course of 5 hours. We utilised all of the quilting frames and machines, along with the Sweet Sixteen.  Several Ladies set about sewing metres and metres of binding on to help completely finish 16 quilts by the end of the day. Any offcuts of fabric and wadding were not wasted either, they were swiftly packed into pillowcases, sewn up and ready to take to Hollytrees Animal Sanctuary for bedding. Another 31 are ready for delivery. The lengths of quilts just kept growing and growing! And again, we had some lovely visitors, this time from Acorns Hospice and Family Foster Care representatives, who see first-hand the joy and comfort that the quilts bring to children who sometimes have very little to call their own.

Quilting day in progress


Ann, Chesterfield & South Sheffield

This is Gill from The Craft Tree in Sheffield holding the quilt which was given to Project Linus, and which has since been given away to Baby Basics. During the Walkley Festival in Sheffield, Gill invited visitors to her shop to do a block for this quilt and at the same time learn about Project Linus.

Gill with her quilt


A letter from Gill

I am so pleased that I found you when I was looking for something to occupy my spare time in the evenings. I have been knitting and crocheting blankets since the spring and I would like to say that my local coordinator Lesley has been a wonderful inspiration to me and a great help guiding me in the right direction. I know I haven’t been doing this for long but I like to check your site to find out what has been happening and how other people are getting on and see what they have done.

Crochet blanket

Looking at your Gallery I have noticed that, almost exclusively, the pictures are of quilts rather than blankets. While I am full of admiration for the skill put into these, something that I cannot do, I would like to see some knitting and crocheting included. I am aware that a plain knitted blanket is not very inspiring but I am sure there are other people like me who are a bit more adventurous. Perhaps you could include a few of these each month to give us an idea of how to make our blanket more fun for the children. You could get your coordinators to sent you some snaps of what comes in to them, I am sure they would like to help. I am away now to start making my last batch of squares up (oh boy these are a bit bright) but I hope someone will love them as I do. Here are the first blankets I made – very best wishes and lots of admiration to every person involved in this most wonderful project.


Pip | Edinburgh

A lovely email:

Hi. You can share this message with anyone you think would like to know: Just think when I was at a show a year ago and saw hug quilts, that a year on, I would receive one – I am not so well at the moment so to get this quilt made by someone who does not know me but like my Grandma who is in WI and made a quilt for hug, you made it with love for me. It has made my day to think someone cares so much. I am awaiting going into surgery today. I am sending an email so please pass on a message from me saying a BIG thank you to the maker of my hug quilt, it’s fluffy, cuddly and cool.
Love from Oliver, Age 11

Newsletter – September 2016

Lyn | News from HQ

Our thanks to Upper Street Events for our free stand at the Festival of Quilts. It is always such an exciting event and we meet so many of our supporters there – and encourage new supporters as well. We were lucky enough to have a big stand this year and were able to put up lots of pictures of our ‘satisfied customers’. The happy smiles on the faces of children cuddled up in their quilts and blankets were very encouraging. We also had some lovely stories of children who had received quilts. I heard today that a boy who received a quilt a while back when going to live with his uncle after his parents died ‘saved the day’ when their little girl was devastated to lose her teddy – he let her borrow his precious quilt to comfort her.

Thanks also to the Warm Company. They have been providing us with free wadding for Linus quilts as well as wadding packs and fabric from Lewis and Irene to use as raffle prizes. They even let us sell raffle tickets from their stand at the show. With this, and our scrap sales, this was by far our most successful fundraising ever.

Finally, thanks to the Game of Quilts – a competition for teams to make a quilt in a day at the Festival while visitors watched. The quilts they made were donated to Linus and are on their way to Birmingham Children’s hospital.


Heather | East Shropshire & West Staffordshire

Once a month, on a Friday, a group of ladies get together in the workroom at the Quilters Quest shop in Bridgnorth to specifically make patchwork tops for Project Linus. They pass the tops to Ann Jermey who quilts them, without charge, on her long arm quilter. Ann hands them back and the ladies put the binding on and gives them the finishing touch of a label. As I am usually given anywhere between 30 – 60 quilts at a time having the label already on them is a bonus. In June this year there was a joint venture at St Nicholas church Oldbury, near Bridgnorth, with an open garden weekend and a show of Linus quilts in the church. Pat Beech was in the church making more tops and promoting Project Linus.

Church quilt exhibition

The joint venture was extremely well attended and very profitable. The proceeds were divided 3 ways and St Nicholas church, the Air Ambulance and Project Linus UK each received a donation of £1,005.11. On August 16th there was a presentation evening in the church where a representative from each of the recipients was invited to attend. As the local co- ordinator I had pleasure in attending and received my big cheque with Pat and Mary the founding ladies of the group at my side.


Philippa | Edinburgh East & Midlothian

A lovely thank you note:
“Thanks to the beautiful hands that made the gorgeous blanket that has made my 2- month old baby girl feel so comfy while poorly in hospital. You are all angels xxx “

Baby on quilt


Ann | South Sheffield & Chesterfield

Reece with his I-Spy quilt

This is Reece, who received an I Spy quilt from sew4others – he is 4 and was born with Angleman Syndrome (which means he has a missing chromosome gene 15 whuich delays normal development). His mum says “we are so happy with Reece’s development although he does struggle with walking on his own, and talking. He loves the blanket and takes it to bed with him. Thanks you so much.”


Gerta | North Norfolk

In June the North Norfolk group were asked to stage a display of our work at the Queen’s Birthday Civic Celebration at Christchurch, Fulmodeston, North Norfolk. The church supports our group and gives us lots of publicity at many events in the village. We were asked to decorate the chancel, from the reredos to the chancel steps, including the altar. Our group made a terrific effort and put up a remarkable display of quilts, blankets, prem hats, snuggle squares and toys made by our members.

We are a small group with only five quilters and 16 knitters and we all worked really hard to show what Project Linus does for our local hospital, which is the Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital. I also collect quilts from a group in Norwich, Surrey Stitchers, and they too contributed lots of beautiful quilts for the display. As you can see, we draped quilts over choir stalls, hung them on walls and put toys on window sills. The centrepiece was the altar which we fronted with a quilt, which actually reflected the tiled floor.

Church quilt display

The display caused much discussion and interest. The outcome was that we have since received many donations of fabric to use in further quilts. We also had a request from Fakenham church for quilts for two bereaved siblings, which we were happy to give. All items have now been donated.

 

Festival of Quilts Challenge 2017

For the first few days of their life babies can only see in black and white, so we are making this our theme for the year.

We’d like you to make a 30” square quilt in a geometric design, using only black and white fabrics. The finished quilt, or top, can be given to your local coordinator or, if preferred, handed over at the Festival of Quilts 2017.

Take a look at our Pinterest board for inspiration, and remember that many of your favourite patterns can easily be adapted to suit a monochrome theme.

Poor Man’s Pineapple

A simple block made from squares.

Pineapple block

Choose a light and dark fabric for best contrast. When making the quilt with only two colours, remember to alternate the colour of the centre square.

Method

  • Cut two squares of contrasting fabric in any size (4″. 5″, 6″)
  • On wrong side of fabric to be cut (not the centre square) draw diagonal lines (see pattern download below for diagrams)
  • Right sides together
  • Sew all around the squares
  • Slide scissors between fabrics and cut along the diagonal lines
  • Open and press out

Pineapple quilt

Download the full pattern here.

Newsletter – July 2016

Lyn | News from HQ

We’re busy planning for our stand at the Festival of Quilts (11th-14th August) at the NEC. The organisers are kind enough to let us have a free stand, but that does mean that they fit us in around their paying customers. Our stand number will be shared on Facebook and Twitter once it becomes available. We will be selling scrap fabric and raffle tickers to raise money for supplies. The Warm Company, who already provide free wadding to lots of Linus events around the country, have provided a number of packs of fleece and fabric as raffle prizes.

Linus coordinators have also taken stands at various other quilting and craft events around the country, several for the first time this year. I don’t know whether there are more shows, or whether we are just getting more involved. Either way, it has been a great way of meeting more people.

Maybe it is just the company I keep, but I feel that there is a real growth in the number of people willing to get involved in activities to help their communities, or perhaps it is that there are now increasing numbers of baby boomers like me reaching retirement and getting stuck in to organising things. There are lots of people with skills and time who are a great and often untapped resource who can make a real difference to the quality of life in their communities. There are some really active Linus ladies around the country who have managed to inspire their fellow needlewomen. This not only benefits the children who receive the quilts and blankets, and their families, but also provides a creative outlet, good company, and a sense of purpose to their makers. Let’s celebrate this sense of a community coming together and take that spirit out into the wider world.


Sylvia | Warrington

Crazy Quilters and Knitters for Linus celebrated their 10th anniversary at their April meeting with a coffee morning. There was a display of the quilts and blankets they had made since Christmas in the church. The event was well attended and we managed to raise lots of funds to continue our work. Regular visitors to our fundraising events have collected several tote bags for their £1 entrance fee from previous events and they proudly bring them, prepared to fill them with their neighbouring areas too.

Screen Shot 2016-07-26 at 21.40.31

Our star prizes for the raffle were a large Japanese style quilt and an Afghan blanket. Each group member had been involved in one or other of these projects. The cushion tombola proved to be popular with everyone. For the younger visitors we had balloon modelling, name the doll and lucky bags. We are very fortunate in getting lots of donations of fabric and wools and although these are not always suitable for Linus, our ladies keep very busy making lots of craft items for our stalls. At the end of the day, the children enjoyed getting involved by picking out the winning raffle tickets. Thank you to all our supporters.


Anita | Biggin Hill

“I just wanted to write to send you on my sincere thanks to yourself and your team at Project Linus for the support that you have recently given to the Biggin Hill Children and Family Centre. As you are aware , our purpose is to support families across the Borough during both difficult and desperate times for many different reasons. Many of the families that we support are impacted from many different situations and rely on professionals and kind-hearted people like you to support them through these difficult periods.

I am pleased to share with you that the blankets that you made and kindly donated have all been gratefully received by parents/carers and children locally that we felt would benefit the most. Thank you once again for all your hard work and support and I wish you every success for the future with the continuation of the amazing work that you do. We hope that you will come and see us again soon at the Children and Family Centre.”


Elspeth | Lanarkshire and Glasgow East

“Dear Elspeth, Just wanted to drop you a wee note to say thank you for the beautifully made quilt that my daughter received when she left Wishaw General yesterday. She loves it and is using it through her recuperation. Please pass on my thanks to the lady or gent that put so much of their time into making it, she will treasure it. Anne Henry”

Screen Shot 2016-07-26 at 21.40.56


Jacquie | West London and North Surrey

Last September I was invite to give a talk about Project Linus to Harlington WI. This went down very well, and there was a lot of interest as I passed around a variety of quilts for the ladies to handle. Not long after this I was contacted by the Chairman of the Middlesex Federation of Women’s Institutes. She had decided to offer a challenge to all of the WIs in Middlesex (50) to make quilts for Project Linus. I provided guidelines for the quilts, and two rolls of wadding were donated by The Warm Company for the challenge.

After their AGM in April (where the quilts were on display) I picked up 55 quilts and 34 knitted blankets which filled my car! The Middlesex WIs had really risen to the challenge and produced a variety of quilts in lots of different designs and sizes – perfect for Project Linus. I am hoping that some of the quilters will continue to make quilts for me as this has proved such a wonderful project.


Sally | Fife

Last week I attended a morning assembly at Masterton Primary School in Dunfermline where I gave a small talk about Linus and received 17 quilts made by P6 and P7. The children also said a few words about what they had been doing:

“Masterson Sewing Club runs every Thursday lunchtime by Mrs Campbell and Nana Barbara for P6 and P7 children who can sew. We try to do our best to use as many recycled materials with our sewing as we can from Masterton jumpers, duvet covers, Dads shirts and a lot more.”

This is the third year I have collected quilts from the school, they are so enthusiastic and keen it does you good to meet them.


Clare | Trossachs, Stirling and Surrounds

I had booked a holiday to Ecuador, and shortly before I left, the devastating earthquake occurred there. I asked my travel company if they had a local contact who could distribute quilts to children affected if I could take some with me. They are involved with supporting this charity and their representative was so very appreciative of the thought, and the quilts. They really were so touched to receive quilts from Project Linus UK. It meant a lot to them that the wider world cared about them.


Jacki | Gloucestershire and Bristol

Four year old Erin had five heart operations cancelled before finally having her surgery in May 2016 at the Children’s Hospital in Bristol. Erin’s Mum Tara has asked if Erin could have a quilt, and by the time she had the surgery, she had two – a hospital quilt and big girl quilt in pink and purple. She’s made a fantastic recovery and is a remarkable little girl.


Get in touch

Please send any articles or photographs for inclusion in the next newsletter to Ann.

Double cut scramble block

Double cut scramble quilt

Start with a selection of 8” or 10 squares. Stack up the squares with right side up.

For 8” squares cut 5 1/2” off
For 10” squares cut 6 1/2” off

Method

  • Use 1/4” seam allowance throughout
  • Make two piles of fabric (large pieces and small pieces)
  • Turn small pile over
  • Taking one from the large pile and one from the small pile (not the same fabric) sew the pieces together
  • Press the seam to the side
  • Turn the block and cut in half
  • Mix up the new halves and sew them together in reverse

8” will finish at approximately 7 1/2”
10” will finish at approximately 9 1/2”

Double cut scramble block

Download the full pattern here.

Disappearing pinwheel

A simple quilt block using a layer cake (10” squares)

Disappearing pinwheel block

For each block you’ll need a 10” plain and a 10” print block

Method

  • Sew together 1/4 inch around all the 10” squares
  • Press and cut on the diagonal in both directions
  • Open out all the pieces, press to ‘print’ fabric
  • Sew four of these together to create a pinwheel
  • Press seams. Measure 2 1/4” from centre seam and cut top to bottom on both sides of centre seam
  • Move the outside pieces around bottom to top
  • Sew new sides to centre

Disappearing pinwheel block

Download the full disappearing Pin Wheel pattern